7 Oct 2011

THE SHIP OF BRIDES.

THE SHIP OF BRIDES by JoJo Moyes.

The year is 1946, and all over the world young women are crossing the sea in their thousands en route to the men they married in wartime, and an unknown future. In Sydney, Australia, four women join 650 other brides and hundreds of naval officers on an extraordinary voyage to England - aboard the Victoria.

Rules of honour, duty and separation are strictly enforced, from the aircraft carrier's captain down to the lowest young stoker. But the men and the brides will find their lives intertwined in ways the Navy could never have imagined ......

And Frances Mckenzie, an enigmatic young bride whose past comes back to haunt her thousands of miles from home - will find that sometimes the journey is more important than the destination.
...... Outer back cover.

FIRST SENTENCE (Prologue): The first time I saw her again, I felt as if I'd been hit.

MEMORABLE MOMENT (Page 240): Loads of woman littering up the place with their washing and nail varnish and frillies and what-have-you. Wandering around in their next-to-nothings, distracting the men from their work. My boys have opened a book on how many little Victors and Victorias will be running around in nine months time.

KEEP IT OR NOT?: Without a doubt I'll be keeping this one.

A brilliant read, one of my favourites this year.

Not for a long time have I found myself so caught up in the fate of the characters of a book - and I'm not just talking about the four brides who make up the main body of the story but also Captain Highfield, his crew, and even the Victoria herself. Yes, hard to believe I found myself so concerned about what would happen to this old ship but I did.

Mainly the story of Margaret, Jean, Avice and Frances, The Ship Of Brides is based on a true story. With a real tearjerker of an ending, it has more ups and downs than, well, a ship on a stormy sea.

But its not just about the 'brides' journey to their new homes. We also get glimpses into their home lives, the reasons why they chose to become war bides. Fascinating reading, this only added to the story and left me feeling as if I really new the women as whole people.

Educational as well as a good read, each chapter begins with a diary/newspaper extract chronicling some of the experiences of the actual experiences of those involved, I certainly wish to find out more about the actual Ship(s) of Brides.

All in all unputdownable, I found myself reading until silly o' clock only to start reading again the minute my eyes were open. I could go on (and on) raving about what I found to be an exceptional read but instead would urge you to read it yourself.


A book exchange read, this was the 70th book I read for the 100+ Reading Challenge.

13 comments:

A said...

Seems like a great book. But I enjoy your review )))

Kelly said...

Your enthusiasm is catching! This sounds like a wonderful book! I know a woman who was a war bride and her story has always fascinated me. I'll check this out. Thanks.

anilkurup said...

Your enthusiasm for reading and the intensity with which you devour books is amazing.
I cannot read from cover to cover a book I cannot like , I mean even when I begin I feel, well this is not for me. That is a pity because I may be missing a good book.

A said...

Tracy,

I missed part of the comment. You have read so many books and keep reading. You write very crisp and like a pro writer.

May be I missed it before - did you write any book or do you plan to write one? You know for sure what it takes to be a good book.

....Petty Witter said...

Thank you for the compliment 'A' but no I've never written a book and no I don't intend to even though Husband dearest keeps encouraging me to do so - bless him, he thinks I have it in me to be a great writer of childrens books.

The Golden Eagle said...

Thank you for the review! It sounds like an amazing book.

A said...

Tracy,

In my opinion, you should write one. i will for sure buy - but not children book. Write something for adults. I think it might take you 3 to 6 months but I honestly think you have the skills to write a good book.

Melissa (Books and Things) said...

YaY!

I'm so glad you found one you just couldn't put down. I love when that happens! Sounds like a great read!

Sridharan said...

The passion for reading is waning these days owing to other mode of knowledge acquisition.. But reading books always is special to me. I get barely any time for it now though. I do enjoy going through some of your reviews, Pettty. You are doing awesome job. I guess, your husband is right..!

Suko said...

Your enthusiasm for this book is wonderful (loved the silly o'clock description), and I know now to add this book to my TBR list. Truly terrific review, Petty!

On a (slightly) related note, I read Dont's for Wives and found it exceptionally charming, and definitely worth dipping into from time to time to refresh my memory and perspective. Thanks for leading me to this gem!

Monalisa said...

Aah Pettywitter ! I really wanna love it. I am pretty damn sure it should be a good read, and once I read it, I pretty well know I can't hold myself up from the book, the way you describe it. I'm sure the style of it would hold me. But! my personal problem, the moment I hear "Loads of woman littering up the place with their washing and nail varnish and frillies and what-have-you. Wandering around in their next-to-nothings, distracting the men from their work. My boys have opened a book on how many little Victors and Victorias will be running around in nine months time" dear, it takes me back ! But the overall look of it,catches me somehow. And the name of the book, looks good.

I'm here again. Hope you are in good health and spirit.

Betty Manousos@ Cut and Dry said...

wonderful review as usual, tracy.

sounds like a wonderful book.

ladypaje said...

wow, this sounds fantastic. Glad you enjoyed it so much.