14 Aug 2017

THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS.

THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS by KENNETH GRAHAME.

ALMA.CO.UK BOOK BLURB: Depicting the adventures of Rat, Mole, Badger and the pretentious Mr Toad, The Wind in the Willows sees these four animals getting into all sorts of trouble as they wander along the river, through the Wild Wood and around the grand Toad Hall.

Adapted for the stage by A.A. Milne as Toad of Toad Hall, and recreated for film and TV numerous times, Kenneth Grahame’s tale has been an essential part of every English child’s formative reading for over a century, with new generations of readers succumbing to its charm, wit and wonder.

FIRST SENTENCE (CHAPTER ONE): The Mole had been working very hard all the morning, spring-cleaning his little home.

MEMORABLE MOMENT: The book was passed on to two young readers of my acquaintance before I could make a note of my Memorable Moment but I do remember my childhood favourite moments involved Mr Toad. TT

SOURCE: Received from Alma Books. Buy a copy by clicking here or, for amazon.co.uk, by clicking on the book title.

READ FOR: Not applicable.

MY THOUGHTS: Another one of my childhood favourites (and indeed one of the few books I've read and re-read as an adult countless times since then) lovingly re-published as part of Alma's Classics collection. 

Whether this be an old favourite of yours or your a new-comer to the adventures of Mole, Ratty, Badger and co, whether your a parent/grandparent revisiting the river bank with a child or indeed a child exploring it for the first time by yourself, whether your enjoying it as merely a story of everyday country folk or as a homily to the bond of friendship or, indeed, as a parable about class struggle/social order, once read the Willows and its motley collection of wonderful characters will never be forgotten.

Yes, I could write any numbers of adjectives to sum up my enjoyment of the book. Yes, reading it over the years, I grew to realise just how many insights into the human condition there were ...  Mr Toad and his mid-life crisis, Ratty and his mild depression - I could go on. However, the one thing that remains a constant is just how gloriously whimsical the whole thing is.


12 comments:

Kelly said...

I'm certainly familiar with the characters and know I'm bound to have read some of the tales, but I don't recall ever sitting down with the full volume.

Makes me a bit nostalgic as It was one of my sister's favorite childhood books.

Melliane said...

Oh it looks nice!

Suko said...

Wonderful review! I read this one many years ago--it's time for a reread!

Brian Joseph said...

Thanks for the memories. This is such a wonderful children's book. I am not sure if I have seen any of the screen versions. I may try to catch one.

Literary Feline said...

It's been ages since I read this--when I was a child and have fond memories of it. I am glad to hear it still holds up.

Gina R said...

Isn't it wonderful how a childhood favorite can take on new meanings and wonder the more life experience get gain? Glad it still kept the magic!

Anonymous said...

Tracy,
Although I am not British, a beautiful
edition of The Wind in the Willows with
Ernest Shepard's illustrations belongs
to my most precious books.
Thank you for your wonderful review.
Raven

Anilkumar Kurup said...

Hello, Its been a while I came to your blog.
' Wind in the Willows", one of my all time favourites. Remember reading it in almost one go. A magnificent one , the illustrations in particular , that doesn't lessen the beauty of the prose.

DMS said...

This looks like a beautiful version. I remember reading Wind in the Willows growing up. As an adult I have come across passages, but haven't reread it. Sounds like one I should add to my list. ;)
~Jess

Yvonne@fiction-books said...

Hi Tracy,

Like so many others, I too read this book in my childhood and although sorely tempted to a re-read in adult life, have simply never got around to it!

As I am slightly older than many of you, as a child, much of my reading experience came from borrowing to the max on my library lending card, which if I remember rightly was the princely sum of 3 books a week!

Owning a book was almost out of the question, except as Christmas or Birthday gifts. As a 4/5 year old I spent a week in hospital having both tonsils and adenoids removed and as a gift for being brave, my dad made me my own small bookcase for my bedroom and various relatives donated books to start off my collection, one of which was 'The Wind In The Willows', although I can't quite recall who gave that particular book, only that it holds a special place in my heart and memory!

Thanks for sharing :)

Yvonne

frayed at the edge said...

I still have my copy from many, many years ago - it was a school prize!!

Karen Alderman said...

I love when a book is timeless like this. You can still get enjoyment out of it whether young or old.

For What It's Worth